Monday, 18 June 2018

"THEY'RE NO TROUBLE!"

'The potential downside to never having anything to do with trouble in your family is the possibility that your family never suspects that trouble ever has anything to do with you.' 
Curt Thompson, The Soul of Shame, p.116.

Friday, 15 June 2018

HELL

'...is the counter echo of God's mandate that it is not good to be alone.'
Curt Thompson, The Soul of Shame, p.114.

OUR DESIRE TO BE DESIRED

'...all sin, all idolatry, all coping strategies in which I indulge are ways for me to satiate my hunger for relationship, my longing to be known and loved, my desire to be desired.' 
Curt Thompson, The Soul of Shame: Retelling the Stories We Believe about Ourselves, p.105. 

Sunday, 3 June 2018

THE IMPORTANCE OF INTUITION

'...the criticism of religion that derides its central intuition as a projection of human fears and desires onto a universe that is alien to such things is itself a projection of human influences, deductions, and expectations onto a universe that is wholly incommensurate with them.' 
Marilynne Robinson, The Givenness of Things, p.220. 

THE LIMITS OF RATIONALISM

'I wish only to say one more time that the rationalistic arguments that claim to winnow out the implausible and the meaningless by applying the flail of common sense are products of bad education. Religions are expressions of the sound human intuition that there is something beyond being as we experience it in this life. What is often described as a sense of the transcendent might in some cases be the intuition of the actual. So the religions are quite right to conceptualize it in terms that exceed the language of common sense. The rationalists are like travelers in a non-English-speaking country who think that they can make themselves understood by shouting. Sadly, too many religious have abandoned their own language, its beauty and subtlety and power, accommodating to the utilitarian expectations of those demanding outsiders who have no understanding of the language or culture and refuse on principle to acquire any. But the unfathomable has a most legitimate place in any conceptualization of an unfathomable reality.' 
Marilynne Robinson, The Givenness of Things, p.212. 

THE CENTRALITY OF THE TRINITY

'Is there are great Christian theology that does not have the Trinity at its center? Does the highest sense of the sacred abide where the Trinity as a concept is isallowed? Well, I think not, for what it's worth.' 
Marilynne Robinson, The Givenness of Things, p.210. 

Saturday, 2 June 2018

THE CIVILIZED MAN?

'Robert Birley, headmaster of Eton when I arrived there in 1959, defined a civilized man as someone who might be the chairman of the Atomic Energy Authority and capable of following the the second lesson at Evensong in the Greek.' 
William Waldegrave, A Different Kind of Weather: A Memoir, p.34. 

Thursday, 31 May 2018

THE LOCAL CHURCH ALWAYS TRUMPS THE PARACHURCH?

'Parachurch organizations...need to regularly evaluate their philosophy and practice in the light of Christ's priority on the church. Similarly, individual Christians, especially those focusing on ministry, should consider whether or not they have slipped into a pattern in which a parachurch group holds more value to them in life and ministry than the local church. No doubt, most parachurch groups are easier to maneuver and get along with than a lot of churches. Yet Jesus sets his affections upon and entrusts the church with his mission in the world. So should we.' 
Phil A Newton, The Mentoring Church, p.121. 

YOU NEED TO HAVE EXPERIENCED A HEALTHY CHURCH TO LEAD A HEALTHY CHURCH?

'One great challenge for many young pastors and church planters happens when they try to lead a church to health when they've never experienced a healthy church firsthand. No academic training can replace the personal experience of a healthy congregation for those who lead a church toward health.' 
Phil A Newton, The Mentoring Church: How Pastors and Congregations Mentor Leaders, p.55. 

CONFIDENT PLURALISM

'Confident pluralism rejects stigmatising others through our speech. At the same time, it requires ut to distinguish between stigmatizing and causing offence...the civic aspiration of tolerance includes the space to make moral judgements. The liberal progressive must be able to say that the conservative moralist holds a view that he finds wrong, misguided, or immoral. And vice versa. Those assertions will likely cause offenses. But they are an important part of the effort to coexist with deep and genuine differences and to allow for people to be persuaded and to change their minds.'
John D Inazu, Confident Pluralism, p.101.